General Interests

Slow Food related postings regarding the rest of the universe

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No Farm, No Foul

No Farm, No Foul
Re-examining the farm to table movement
by Tracey Middlekauff @urbanitemdfood

• Farm to table generally means rusticity, authenticity, purity, and simplicity, but some chefs note that it stifles creativity and technique.
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Save the dates

We have been asked to post the dates of our events so that everyone knows what we are planning. The first is this year’s installment of the film series, which will be April 20 at the Green Center on HACC’s midtown campus.  The film being shown is Home, more details to come soon! 

The second event is our annual fall Meet the Producers dinner at HACC.  The date for that is Friday, September 28. This will be held at the Wildwood Conference Center. Stay tunes for detail on the menu.

 We are working on a couple fo other events for early Spring so please keep an eye out on this site.

 

 

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Current Food Policy Movies of Note

Film screenings and film-related events are always popular.  A recent leader call on planning & hosting an effective event turned up a bunch of questions about how to secure licenses, how much to charge, etc.  This thread will be a place to check in about current movie opportunities as well as a place to discuss the various logistics of planning a movie-related event. Continue reading

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Why Local Food Systems are an Opportunity for Industry

By Jess Halliday, reprinted from FoodNavigator.com and posted 07-Feb-2011

The food industry should not rage against the idea of professionalised local food systems, nor unleash its lobbying force to uproot them before their green shoots can reach maturity. Rather, it should explore ways to benefit from local foods and, in turn, foster their development. Continue reading

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Are we getting what we pay for?

Americans love cheap food. We spend less of our incomes on food now than ever before. In 1949, we allotted 22% of our incomes to food. In 2009, that figure dropped to only 10% (about half of what the Japanese and French spend). Seems good until you correlate another set of statistics. Back in 1959, only 4% of children were overweight. Today that figure has climbed to 19%. In 1979, 28% of adults were overweight. Now it’s a shocking 64%.
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Monsanto’s GMO Products to Blanket the Earth

Monsantos acreage growingThe Associated Press just uncovered a series of confidential commercial licensing agreements that give around 200 smaller companies the right to insert Monsanto’s genes (resistant to their Roundup herbicide) in their corn and soybean plants.

This means that Monsanto will OWN and CONTROL roughly 95 percent of all soybeans and 80 percent of all corn grown in the U.S. Monsanto is blocking competition in the seed industry, forcing farmers into growing genetically modified crops, and all the while increasing seed prices. Now, when farmers buy bags of seed from obscure brand names, they are paying for Monsanto’s seeds. To read the AP article, click here.
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Slow Food at 20: The Graceful Revolution

Reprint from The Financial Times, December 12, 2009 By Harry Eyres
Slow Food at 20I don’t often feel tempted to raise my hand in salute but I’m making an exception for the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Slow Food Manifesto in Paris in December 1989. This is a fraternal greeting to the inspired organisation which, at the tail end of the most violent century in history, provided the perfect antidote to that lamentable paean to speed, Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto of 1909. Slow Food has not merely mobilised the beneficent force of slowness (which can be surprisingly powerful, like the tree-men Ents in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings) but has also provided one of the bases for a new politics of food and environmental quality.
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